Archive for the ‘Enterprise Architecture’ Category

What is a database? Once upon a time, it was simple. The database was a modern Bob Cratchit putting data in tables made up of very straight columns filled with one row per entry. Long, endless rectangles of information stretching on into the future.

The relational database has been the bedrock of modern computing. The vast majority of websites are just a bunch of CSS lipstick painted on top of SQL. Everything that makes us special is just another row … Read the rest

Self-driving cars, face detection software, and voice controlled speakers all are built on machine learning technologies and frameworks–and these are just the first wave. Over the next decade, a new generation of products will transform our world, initiating new approaches to software development and the applications and products that we create and use.

As a Java developer, you want to get ahead of this curve now–when tech companies are beginning to seriously invest in machine learning. What you learn … Read the rest

After multiple delays, Java 9, the first major upgrade to the standard edition of Java since March 2014, is due to arrive on September 21, in the form of Java Development Kit 9. The official proposal for JDK 9 lists roughly 90 new features; modularity is the major one, reconfiguring Java into a modular format in an effort that has gone on for years. But there are other improvements in areas such as compilation, code cache and JavaScript … Read the rest

Today, Structured Query Language is the standard means of manipulating and querying data in relational databases, though with proprietary extensions among the products. The ease and ubiquity of SQL have even led the creators of many “NoSQL” or non-relational data stores, such as Hadoop, to adopt subsets of SQL or come up with their own SQL-like query languages.

But SQL wasn’t always the “universal” language for relational databases. From the beginning (circa 1980), SQL had certain strikes … Read the rest

Google, which has had to claw its way back into cloud relevance in the shadows of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, suddenly finds itself playing catchup again, thanks to the rise of serverless computing. Although Google Cloud Platform still trails AWS and Azure by a considerable margin in general cloud revenue, its strengths in AI and container infrastructure (Kubernetes) have given it a credible seat at the cloud table.

Or would, if the world weren’t quickly … Read the rest

Apache Kafka is on a roll. Last year it registered a 260 percent jump in developer popularity, as Redmonk’s Fintan Ryan highlights, a number that has only ballooned since then as IoT and other enterprise demands for real-time, streaming data become common. Hatched at LinkedIn, Kafka’s founding engineering team spun out to form Confluent, which has been a primary developer of the Apache project ever since.

But not the only one. Indeed, given the rising importance of … Read the rest

The JS Foundation is taking jurisdiction over Architect, an open source software project for provisioning and maintaining cloud infrastructure from a simple text file, with a focus on AWS Lambda and eventually other serverless computing implementations.

The Architect project proposes a file format referred to as .arc. It is intended to be a simpler way of setting up and maintaining Lambda cloud functions than deploying them manually or using infrastructure administration tools such as TerraForm. The .arc format is “easier … Read the rest

Serverless computing may be the hottest thing in cloud computing today, but what, exactly, is it? In this two-part article you’ll get started with serverless computing–from what it is, to why it’s considered disruptive to traditional cloud computing, and how you might find yourself using it in Java-based programming. Following the overview, you’ll get a tutorial introduction to AWS Lambda, which is considered by many the premiere Java-based solution for serverless computing today. In Part 1, you’ll use AWS Lambda … Read the rest

Scaling a relational database isn’t easy. Scaling a relational database out to multiple replicas and regions over a network while maintaining strong consistency, without sacrificing performance, is really hard.

ed choice plumInfoWorld

How hard? The CAP Theorem says that you can only have two of the following three properties: consistency, 100 percent availability, and tolerance to network partitions.

A network partition is a break that blocks all possible paths between some two points on the network. Partitions do happen, even if you … Read the rest

Have you ever wondered about the software used in big science facilities? A professional science facility brings together incredibly sophisticated machinery with equally complex software, which is used to do things like drive motors, control robots, and position and run experimental detectors. We also use software to process and store the terrabytes of data created by daily science experiments.

In this article you’ll get an inside look at the software infrastructure used at Diamond Light Source (Diamond), which is the … Read the rest