Archive for the ‘Cloud Computing’ Category

Google has made the Java 8 runtime generally available on App Engine, the Google Cloud Platform’s development platform service. Google said the upgrade removes performance limitations Java developers have had to deal with when using the Java 7 runtime. Java 7 remains a supported option. 

“Unfortunately, using Java 7 on App Engine standard environment also required compromises, including limited Java classes, unusual thread execution, and slower performance because of sandboxing overhead,” said Amir Rouzrokh, Google product manager.

These … Read the rest

What is a database? Once upon a time, it was simple. The database was a modern Bob Cratchit putting data in tables made up of very straight columns filled with one row per entry. Long, endless rectangles of information stretching on into the future.

The relational database has been the bedrock of modern computing. The vast majority of websites are just a bunch of CSS lipstick painted on top of SQL. Everything that makes us special is just another row … Read the rest

Google, which has had to claw its way back into cloud relevance in the shadows of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, suddenly finds itself playing catchup again, thanks to the rise of serverless computing. Although Google Cloud Platform still trails AWS and Azure by a considerable margin in general cloud revenue, its strengths in AI and container infrastructure (Kubernetes) have given it a credible seat at the cloud table.

Or would, if the world weren’t quickly … Read the rest

A long time ago, developers wrote assembly code that ran fast and light. On good days, they had enough money in their budget to hire someone to toggle all those switches on the front of the machine to input their code. On bad days, they flipped the switches themselves. Life was simple: The software loaded data from memory, did some arithmetic, and sent it back. That was all.

Today, developers must work with teams spread across multiple continents where people … Read the rest

The JS Foundation is taking jurisdiction over Architect, an open source software project for provisioning and maintaining cloud infrastructure from a simple text file, with a focus on AWS Lambda and eventually other serverless computing implementations.

The Architect project proposes a file format referred to as .arc. It is intended to be a simpler way of setting up and maintaining Lambda cloud functions than deploying them manually or using infrastructure administration tools such as TerraForm. The .arc format is “easier … Read the rest

Scaling a relational database isn’t easy. Scaling a relational database out to multiple replicas and regions over a network while maintaining strong consistency, without sacrificing performance, is really hard.

ed choice plumInfoWorld

How hard? The CAP Theorem says that you can only have two of the following three properties: consistency, 100 percent availability, and tolerance to network partitions.

A network partition is a break that blocks all possible paths between some two points on the network. Partitions do happen, even if you … Read the rest

With every innovation comes new complications. Containers made it possible to package and run applications in a convenient, portable form factor, but managing containers at scale is challenging to say the least.

Kubernetes, the product of work done internally at Google to solve that problem, provides a single framework for managing how containers are run across a whole cluster. The services it provides are generally lumped together under the catch-all term “orchestration,” but that covers a lot of territory: scheduling … Read the rest

DynamoDB, a fully-managed NoSQL database, is an impressive piece of technology, and it’s amazing that AWS has opened it for the entire world to use. What took millions of dollars in R&D to build – a product that services millions of queries per second with low latency – can be effectively rented for dollars per hours by anyone with a credit card. For those who need a key-value store that can store massive amounts of data reliably, there aren’t … Read the rest

Why would a developer use AWS Lambda? In a word, simplicity. AWS Lambda—and other event-driven, “function-as-a-service” platforms such as Microsoft Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions, and IBM OpenWhisk—simplify development by abstracting away everything in the stack below the code. Developers write functions that respond to certain events (a form submission, a webhook, a row added to a database, etc.), upload their code, and pay only when that code executes.

In “How serverless changes application development” I covered the … Read the rest

Amazon Web Services clearly dominates the field. One of the first clouds, AWS is today’s leading choice for good reason. It offers so many options and services under its virtual roof that it’s nearly impossible to summarize the breadth. There are dozens of machine types to choose from, dozens of ways to store data, and hundreds if not thousands of software packages you can use to build out your environment. That’s the definition of the 800-pound gorilla in the cloud.… Read the rest