May 26th, 2018

Ian Ozsvald: “Creating correct and capable classifiers” at PyDataAmsterdam 2018

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This weekend I got to attend PyDataAmsterdam 2018 – this is my first trip to the Netherlands (Yay! It is lovely here). I gave an updated talk on my earlier presentation for PyDataLondon 2018, this time I spoke more on :

  • YellowBrick‘s ROC curves
  • SHAPley machine learning explanations
  • Along with my earlier ideas on diagnosis using Pandas and T-SNE

I had a lovely room, wide enough that I only got a third of my audience in the shot below:… Read the rest

May 25th, 2018

Martin Fitzpatrick: Brown Note

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Relieve your creative blockages with these interactive desktop reminders.

Brown Note is a desktop notes application written in Python, using PyQt. The notes are implemented as decoration-less
windows, which can be dragged around the desktop and edited. Details in the notes, and their position on the desktop,
is stored in a SQLite file database, via SQLAlchemy, with note details and positions being restored on each session.

Brown Note.

Data model

The storage of user notes in the app is handled by a … Read the rest

May 25th, 2018

EuroPython: EuroPython 2018: Talk voting is open

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At EuroPython, we let our attendees have a significant say in the selection of the sessions which are presented at the conference. We call this “talk voting” – attendees can tell us which submitted talks they’d like to see at the conference.

image

To be eligible to vote for talks, you need to be a submitter of talks and everyone who attended one of the previous year’s EuroPython conferences.

Since we’re a bit short on time, talk voting will only be Read the rest

May 25th, 2018

PyCharm: PyCharm 2018.1.4 RC

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We’re happy to announce that the release candidate for a new version of PyCharm is now available: get it now from our confluence page.

Improved in this Version

  • Various issues related to installing packages, both with Conda and virtualenv, were resolved in this version
  • Compilation errors in PL/SQL procedures are now shown in the console output. Did you know that you can manage Oracle databases (and other major databases) in PyCharm Professional Edition? PyCharm Pro bundles all database features
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May 24th, 2018

Reinout van Rees: Djangocon: slow food digest better (maintain an old project) – Christopher Grebs

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(One of my summaries of a talk at the
2018 european djangocon.)

Full title: "slow food digest better – or how to maintain an 8.5 year old
python project without getting lost". Christopher had to maintain such a
project – and actually liked it. It was https://addons.mozilla.org, actually.

It started out as a quickly-hacked-together php project. Now it an almost
modern django project. The transition from PHP to the django version took
almost 16 months. During that time

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May 24th, 2018

Reinout van Rees: Djangocon: automated spell checking in django projects – Jakob Schnell

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(One of my summaries of a talk at the
2018 European djangocon.)

We are humans and we make typos. So there are typos in our code.

The two common places for typos are documentation and the user interface.

Documentation is normally only provided in a single language and it are large
text files, so spell checking is relatively easy. Django documentation is
often build with Sphinx. For that, there is a sphinx extension:
sphinxcontrib-spelling. You can even integrate

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May 23rd, 2018

Data School: Best practices with pandas (video series)

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At the PyCon 2018 conference, I presented a tutorial called “Using pandas for Better (and Worse) Data Science”. Through a series of exercises, I demonstrated best practices with pandas to help students become more fluent at using pandas to answer data science questions and avoid data science errors.

I split the tutorial into 10 videos. The first video introduces the tutorial and the dataset, and the other nine videos contain the exercises that we discuss. I recommend that you Read the rest

May 23rd, 2018

Reinout van Rees: Djangocon: accessibility matters: building a better web – Lindsey Dragun

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(One of my summaries of a talk at the
2018 european djangocon.)

Lindsey runs the DisabledInTech slack channel.

For Web accessibility, see
https://www.w3.org/WAI/fundamentals/accessibility-intro/ as a good
intro. There are standards to help with accessibility and for many government
instances, they’re mandatory.

Disabilities are often grouped in: visual, auditory, motor/physical,
cognitive/neurological, language/speech.

There are other (more inclusive!) ways to group: permanent (born blind),
temporary (like just being sick!), acquired (like ageing), societal (like
lefthandedness). Notice how this comes much closer?

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May 22nd, 2018

Stack Abuse: Implementing LDA in Python with Scikit-Learn

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In our previous article Implementing PCA in Python with Scikit-Learn, we studied how we can reduce dimensionality of the feature set using PCA. In this article we will study another very important dimensionality reduction technique: linear discriminant analysis (or LDA). But first let’s briefly discuss how PCA and LDA differ from each other.

PCA vs LDA: What’s the Difference?

Both PCA and LDA are linear transformation techniques. However, PCA is an unsupervised while LDA is a supervised dimensionality reduction … Read the rest

May 22nd, 2018

Mike Driscoll: Filling PDF Forms with Python

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Fillable forms have been a part of Adobe’s PDF format for years. One of the most famous examples of fillable forms in the United States are documents from the Internal Revenue Service. There are lots of government forms that use fillable forms. There are many different approaches for filling in these forms programmatically. The most time consuming method I have heard about is to just recreate the form in ReportLab by hand and then fill it in. Frankly I think

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